safe working conditions

This morning I found an email which I sent to a one time colleague a couple of years ago, the chaotic conditions I describe are quite true

Good morning Michael,
I hope you and your family are well and life is being kind to you.
In June I will have been retired for eight years, apart from a few minor problems I really enjoy life; retirement is the best job I ever had. I worked for 49 years and I never wanted a job in the first place.
A few days ago I was thinking about a dye house I used to visit. The floor was always several inches deep in an evil smelling fluid which dissolved the stitching in shoes so that the soles fell off later that day, it was impossible to see very far because of the steam but the fork truck driver seemed to know where you were because he could always drive close enough to splash you up to the knees. The dye house manager's "office" was a small garden shed which was difficult to find, partly because of the steam and partly because it tended to float around from one place to another. This problem was eventually solved by boring holes in the floor so it sank which meant that meetings were held with the evil fluid lapping around the ankles. The dyer never did any shade matching, he was too busy repairing machines because the mechanic dare not leave the boiler house, he had to spend all his time topping up the water level in the boiler---with a hand pump. The managing director spent most of his time talking to two donkeys in the field at the back of the works. I had many meetings with him in the field. I think the donkeys were specially trained to bite any one who talked about unpaid bills ---which was the purpose of most meetings. This company always delivered the goods on time and made money which is more than can be said for the world financial institutions.
Keep Smiling
John
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